Lab Updates July 2016

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HummingbirdsTime is flying on all sides of project MacroBird. We have some big changes on the horizon in coming months with scanning targets to meet, team members moving on and tweaks to some of our data collection processes.

This month we were joined by a second undergraduate from the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences at Sheffield. After being awarded a SURE (Sheffield Undergraduate Research Experience) grant, Louie Rombaut spent a fortnight with us at the Natural History Museum, shadowing our work and making use of the fantastic ornithology library collections. He will be using our scans to investigate hummingbird feeding behaviour for his summer project- it’s great to see the data being put to use already!

Data Collection in Tring: 3D scanning and UV photography

Hummingbirds have featured heavily in our lab updates for the last couple of months and July is no different. These long, sometimes curved and often extremely fine bills have really put our scanning equipment and skills to the test! As such an interesting family however, they are one of our priorities so we have continued to work through the huge number of species, alongside the equally varied and challenging tyrant flycatchers.

One of the things we don’t often talk about on this blog are the practicalities of working with museum specimens. For the scanning and photography sides of the project, we are using the birds in quite different ways- focussing on different aspects that require very different approaches for data collection.

Whilst the bill scanning uses only one specimen and is a steady, time-consuming process with the birds virtually static, the photography method requires us to sample up to six specimens of every species, rotating the birds to capture all angles of their plumage. Varying vastly in condition, size and preparation method, the research skins need to be handled securely and with care so having the right equipment to allow us to do this is really important.

Scanning

As you might expect, there isn’t a big market for this kind of product so there is a good amount of experimentation, testing and DIY involved. This month we have been working on a new ‘stand’ to support a wider variety of specimen sizes for photography and will begin putting it to the test next month.

MarkMyBird and #BeakoftheWeek

This scanning focus does mean there is now a wide variety of Trochilidae scans ready for landmarking on our crowdsourcing site MarkMyBird so, if you’re interested in seeing the variety of bill form within this fascinating family, head on over. You can always have a browse through our gallery to look at some interesting species or get a feel for the 3D models we are generating, it might just inspire you to sign-up and contribute to this vast study.

Frilled coquetteLophornis magnificus)

Frilled coquette (Lophornis magnificus)

There have been some great picks of species on #BeakoftheWeek lately, including this weeks challenge- the Apostlebird. You can read more about these mudnesters in our most recent blog post here.

We’ve also written about a #Beakoftheweek pick from a few weeks back- the reedhaunters– a pair of species first collected by Charles Darwin aboard HMS Beagle with a fascinating taxonomic and historical background, just a click away on our team blog.

John Gould's original illustrations of the Reedhaunters, with Limnoctites rectirostris thought to have been painted directly from the type specimen

John Gould’s original illustrations of the Reedhaunters

 

Images
– The Chilean Woodstars (Eulidia yarrellii), from ‘A monograph of the Trochilidæ, or family of humming-birds’ by John Gould. Courtesy of the Biodiversity Heritage Library: http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.51056
– Photograph of a bird being scanned and 3D scan of the frilled coquette, copyright Natural History Museum, London and Tring.
– John Gould’s illustrations of the Reedhaunters (Limnoctites rectirostris and Limnornis curvirostris) from The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. Courtesy of the Biodiversity Heritage Library: http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.14216