Lab Updates June 2016

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Team2

June saw team member Chris Moody (dog whisperer, last on the right) move on from his role as photographer-extraordinaire to challenges anew. Alongside our farewells to Chris, the usual data collection and analysis have been keeping us all busy..

We were also joined by an undergraduate from the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences at Sheffield, Will Wood, for a fortnight. After successfully being awarded a SURE (Sheffield Undergraduate Research Experience) grant, Will (who is interested in how UV plumage is affected by the environment, with a particular focus on South American suboscine passerines) came to shadow the team during data collection at the Natural History Museum, having a go at photography, scribing and using these amazing collections.

Data Collection in Tring: 3D Scanning

Haeckel HummingbirdsThis month we finally finished scanning the majority of the sunbirds (Nectariniidae), a massive task requiring lots of patience! We are still left with a number of large families with narrow, fine or bristly bills to occupy us, including the tyrant flycatchers (Tyrannidae).

A current target remains to continue working our way through the more than 300 species of hummingbird (Trochilidae). This month, we scanned some species of Lophornis, a genus of particularly tiny hummingbirds known as the coquettes. These fantastic birds have some of the most outlandish plumage, with the males displaying particularly colourful crests and markings.

Many of the hummingbirds have brilliant names, and some of our favourites from recent weeks include the festive coquette (Lophornis chalybeus), the bronze-tailed plumeleteer (Chalybura urochrysia), the blossomcrown (Anthocephala floriceps) and the glowing puffleg (Eriocnemis vestita).

To date we have scanned:

  • 7159 (71.64%) of species
  • 3338 (82.38%) of species from island families
  • 3893 (62.25%) of passerines
  • 3263 (81.03%) of non-passerines

Data Collection in Tring: UV and Visible Photography

The Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

The Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

One of the main families we have been photographing this month are the Starlings (Sturnidae) – displaying some of the most impressive iridescence we’ve come across yet. Even the Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), with its white feather tips and glossy greenish, blue, and purple sheen, has beautiful, complex plumage when viewed up close.

Lamprotornis Starlings. Above Left: Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus), Above Right: Burchell's Starling (Lamprotornis australis), Below: Emerald Starling (Lamprotornis iris)

Lamprotornis Starlings. Above Left: Superb Starling (L. superbus), Right: Burchell’s Starling (L. australis), Below: Emerald Starling (L. iris)

Our process of imaging each specimen requires a series of single dorsal, ventral and lateral shots. These static images don’t necessarily display this extraordinary iridescence in all its variety (as with these photographs taken in the field) but will allow us to compare and assess the extent to which, if at all, these species utilise UV reflecting plumage.

To date we have reached:

  • 69 (35.57%) of families
  • 2654 (26.56%) of species
  • 12264 specimens: we are selecting up to 6 specimens of each species, both male and female
  • 75384 photographs: six photographs- dorsal, ventral and lateral in both UV and human visible spectrums- of every selected specimen

Mark My Bird

Our crowdsourcing site markmybird.org has now exceeded 840 registered landmarkers- with 3D bill models for over half of all extant world bird species available, there is a huge variety to view and landmark. As mentioned above, we have recently been working on scanning the bills of as many species of hummingbird as possible so these will soon be uploaded for people to explore with other new species regularly added as they are imaged from the museum’s collections. If you would like a go, simply visit our site markmybird.org and sign up, everyone’s efforts- however big or small- will help contribute to this huge research project.

#BeakoftheWeek

Our twitter competition #BeakoftheWeek has continued every Wednesday (plus the occasional surprise Thursday). Everyone is welcome to join in and have a go at guessing the species of bird from one of our fantastic 3D bill models. One of this month’s challenges was the straight-billed reedhaunter (Limnoctites rectirostris), pictured here (more on this bird at a later date). If you think you’ve got what it takes, have a guess and perhaps even make it into our leaderboard!

Publications

Cooper, N., Thomas, G.H., & FitzJohn, R.G. (2016). Shedding light on the ‘dark side’of phylogenetic comparative methods. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 7(6): 693-699.

Images

Page from Ernest Haeckel’s Kunstformen der Natur (1904), showing a variety of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) is out of copyright

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) taken by Koshy Koshy is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Lamprotornis Starlings
Above Left: Superb Starling (Lamprotornis superbus) taken by Sumeet Moghe is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 
Above Right: Burchell’s Starling (Lamprotornis australis) taken by Bernard DUPONT is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Below: Emerald Starling (Lamprotornis iris) taken by Doug Janson is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0